Mind the Gap

May 7 to July 16, 2011

Alexander Wolff, Wandbild KAI 10 Düsseldorf, 2011, collage on wall, Courtesy Galerie Ben Kaufmann, Berlin, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Mind the Gap, works by Berthold Reiß and Alexander Wolff, © VG-Bildkunst, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Berthold Reiß, Die Lehre, 2011, pencil, acrylic paint, acrylic binder, graphite, 3 m x 8,40 m, Courtesy Galerie Ben Kaufmann, Berlin, © VG-Bildkunst, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Mind the Gap, foreground: Berthold Reiß, Doppelte Sphäre, 2010, Courtesy Galerie Jahn Baaderstraße, München, © VG-Bildkunst, background: Alexander Wolff, Wandbild KAI 10 Düsseldorf, 2011, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Alexander Wolff, ohne Titel, 2009, dispersion colour on ingrain wallpaper on muslin, cotton, Courtesy Galerie Ben Kaufmann

Andy Hope 1930, FM-2030, 2011, mixed media, 18 parts, Courtesy Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin © VG-Bildkunst, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Andy Hope 1930, FM-2030 (Detail), 2011, mixed media, 18 parts, Courtesy Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin, © VG-Bildkunst, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, 2011

Barbara Wüllenweber, Skaterpark Liege, Belgium / Backside Grab, 1989, s/w Foto, Courtesy the artist, © VG-Bildkunst

Mind the Gap, works by Barbara Wüllenweber, © VG-Bildkunst, installation view KAI 10

Raum für Kunst, Düsseldorf

Andy Hope 1930, USS Enterprise, Courtesy Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin, © VG-Bildkunst

Andy Hope 1930
Berthold Reiß
Alexander Wolff
Barbara Wüllenweber

Curators: Zdenek Felix, Ben Kaufmann

The public appeal to “Mind the Gap,” known from London’s Underground, is meant to help people have an easy, accident-free day. In another sense, this phrase makes us aware that there is a gap between objects and the flow of things in general; something is singled out and set apart from other things. An ordinary, everyday object is transformed into a sign, and while it takes on a new function in a new context, its reference to reality is reinforced. Every artistic process is based on this kind of invisible transformation of an object. Various mise-en-scene strategies used in the context of an exhibition also emphasize the remoteness of a work of art. In KAI 10’s show, MIND THE GAP, the presentation is primarily grounded in the spatial connections among the works by the four independent artists, Andy Hope 1930, Berthold Reiss, Alexander Wolff, and Barbara Wüllenweber. The exhibition links them all into a kind of parcours, which seizes upon different spatial manifestations usually found in the public space and everyday contexts. Posters, archeological digs, murals, and sculptures derived from architecture give form to the exhibition and create a relationship between the show and the space at KAI 10.